All Text and Photographs © 2019 by Thomas K. Shor. Copyright Notice
Escape Media  Publishers, USA Cover, 2003

WINDBLOWN CLOUDS, my first book, was published in the USA (2003) and in India (2006). It recounts a journey I took in my early twenties, first to Greece and then to India.

 

The two stories in the book center on two men I met, an elderly Greek Orthodox monk with whom I lived for a time alone in a stone mountaintop monastery in Greece, and Ed Spencer, a brilliant 70-year-old ex-Harvard professor who had given up his life in the West to become an ascetic philosopher vagabond in India. It was with Ed I first went to India. 

The USA print edition tells both stories; the Indian edition only the second—about Ed and India. Each is now available as a separate eBook.

FROM THE REVIEW BY THE BRITISH POET KATHLEEN RAINE:


    In Thomas Shor’s narrative the absorbing writing is the least of his gifts: he creates the imaginative adventure of his life as he lives it. He plunges into the story almost by accident, leaving a steamer bound for Athens by mistake at Corfu. But in Thomas Shor’s life there are no mistakes, only opportunities, and before long we find him sharing the life of the last surviving monk at a monastery high on Mount Pantokrator, his meals of chickpeas, garlic and olive oil, his toils, and the dense fogs and storms of the highest mountain on Corfu. The old monk wants him to become his successor, but life runs on, leading perhaps inevitably to the Indian sub-continent. 
    Thomas Shor’s life is a continual unfolding of those inner and outer worlds which his sense of wonder discovers continually. His story reminds us that we are, or could be, travelers in a world of marvels, of love, and encounters with men and women themselves on pilgrimages of the imagination. Did not the Emperor Haroun al-Rashid for a thousand and one nights hear in the city of Baghdad endless stories that make up the one story of the world? Once involved in Thomas Shor’s adventure of life, one hopes only for more. 

Kathleen Raine (D.Litt., Cambridge; Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, France; Commander of the British Empire; Winner—Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, etc.)

Each Part of the book is now available

as a separate eBook

The Monk and the Sly Chickpea tells the story of a journey I took in 1981 as a young man to the Greek island of Corfu. My journey starts in an idyllic coastal village in a house surrounded by lush fruit and olive trees. While many a young man’s journey to Greece would feature a coastal village and even a strip of white beach, my journey led me, with a certain inevitability, to the island’s highest mountain, the wind-swept and craggy Mount Pantokrator, and to the ancient stone monastery that crowns its peak. It was there that I lived with the monastery’s sole inhabitant of over forty years, a Greek Orthodox monk named Evthókimos Koskinás, a man of both the mountain and of God. From that stormy peak, often pounded by bolder-splitting lightning, sharing meals of chickpeas seasoned with the mountain’s wild herbs drenched in olive oil, I came to some startlingly profound insights for a young man of twenty-two.

 

The Monk and the Sly Chickpea has been revised and has a new Postscript describing my return to Corfu and my encounters with the monk after twenty years. The book was originally published as Part I of Windblown Clouds by Escape Media Publishers, USA, in 2003.  

Evthókimos Koskinás

“I THINK YOU SHOULD COME WITH ME TO INDIA”

    Thus begins Into the Hands of the Unknown, which picks up my story as a young man when I happened to sit next to Ed Spencer, a brilliant seventy-year-old ex-Harvard professor, turned wandering holy man, who makes this offer within an hour of our meeting on a Greek ferry.

    Though unsure whether the old man is some kind of a bum or a realized being or both, I agree to go with this enigmatic stranger whose credo is, “Take the money out of your pocket and put yourself in the hands of the Unknown.”

    When we arrive in Greece and Ed passes the money exchange with hardly a glance, I begin to understand the gulf that separates the old man from the rest of humanity.

    The ensuing journey, recounted in the pages of Into the Hands of the Unknown, takes us on an epic trip by foot into the heart of South India and then to the Himalayas where I made my first contact with the Tibetan people.

    Into the Hands of the Unknown has been revised and has a new Postscript describing my subsequent encounters with the Ed Spencer. The book was originally published as Part II of Windblown Clouds

Edmond J. Spencer

You can also order the paperback versions of Windblown Clouds:

Escape Media Publishers, USA, 2003
Pilgrims Publishers, India, 2006

Read Excerpts

Excerpts from Greece

No. 1 Preface
No. 2 Low Cloud Pierced by High Mountain
No. 3 To the Coast
No. 4 Alone with the Mountain

Excerpts from India

No. 5 Kingdom of the Road
No. 6 Arrival in India
No. 7 Market at Matunga Road, Bombay
No. 8 The Main Trunk Road to the Interior
No. 9 Into the Heart of the South
No. 10 Echo of the Inner Walls